Next Gen iPhone Found Lost in a Bar



By: OMER SHACHNAI  
Published: April 21st 2010
in News » World

IPhone

Another one of Apple's notorious gimmicks or a spoof? A prototype of the new, yet to be released, iPhone 4G had been found left behind in a bar in Redwood City (San Francisco Bay Area), California. It seems an Apple employee had forgotten the phone either accidentally or deliberately in the bar and Gizmodo, a trustworthy and familiar website, was able to obtain it.  According to Gizmodo, they have dissected the phone and found that all the internal parts and components are clearly labelled as Apple and not a knock off as many believed. So has Apple done it again?

The first analysis shows that the device contains new components. These new found parts suggest that the new iPhone isn't just like the previous 3GS, only suited up with a new case.

 

So, without further ado, here are the big additions: A new front-facing camera (will probably enable video chat), an improved regular back-camera (they claim the lens is noticeably larger than the old one), camera flash - a feature many Apple groupies have been yearning for quite some time now.

Moreover, the device has a slot for a Micro-SIM instead of a standard SIM (just like the one the new iPad uses).  The guys at Gizmodo also claim the forgotten device has an improved display (it's unclear if it's the 960x460 display thrown around before).  In addition, there seems to be a secondary mic for noise cancellation next to the headphones jack. The volume button has been split into two different buttons. The volume button as well as the mute and power buttons get a new metallic look.

What else has changed? Well for starters, the back of the phone is entirely flat, made of either glass (most likely), ceramic or shiny plastic in order for the cell signal to poke through.  An aluminum border goes completely around the outside.  A slightly smaller screen than the 3GS (but seemingly higher resolution).  The phone has a new drastically different exterior – a more "squared off" look.  Now you have a thinner body, with no wasted space and lots of hard lines.  The phone is 3 grams heavier too.  The phone's battery is 16 per cent larger, while other internal components are shrunken, miniaturized and reduced to make room for it.

 

Unfortunately, they claim the phone had been remotely disabled by Apple, so no one was able to test out the new features on it.  Whether it's true or not, the entire story seems too good to be true, and it would come as no surprise if it were just another one of those publicity stunts Apple is so famous for.  When connecting the phone to a computer, it behaves exactly like an iPhone does when it's plugged in, with the proper boot sequence and "connect to iTunes" restore functionality.  Perhaps, a sign of its authenticity?  However, the Firmware cannot be loaded, since it is tied to the device model, and in this case there is no firmware yet for the 4G.

 

Why do they think it's real? The people at Gizmodo said that after playing around with the phone for a week, "The overall quality feels exactly like a finished final Apple phone – and after disassembling this unit, there is so much evidence stacked in its favour, that there's very little possibility that it's a fake. In fact, the possibility is almost none." What was the feeling like? "Freaking amazing. As a person who never really liked the round mound of a back in the 3GS, the sleeker, flatter, squarer design is super welcome. It feels sturdier than the 3GS, and much less plasticky. The metal buttons give it a heftier feel – less of a toy – than all previous generations."

 

Currently, it is rumoured Apple will officially announce the iPhone 4G in June, so this "incident" could mean we are getting close to a final retail model.  Up until then, it is still speculation whether this is real or not.  If it is real, either Apple left it in the bar intentionally, or perhaps one of Apple's employees is looking for a new job.  



Related articles: (IPhone, Apple, IPad)




Share with friends Print this page Read later Recommend 1 times